So, you’ve seen the pothole and there’s no way around it. What now? If you’re like most drivers, at this point you just grit your teeth and drive through it. And that might be the best approach, according to a new study from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS).

Potholes can cause serious damage to tyres, rims and steering systems. They also have a negative effect on suspension systems and bodywork. If you’re unlucky enough to hit a pothole, your best bet is to slow down as soon as possible and proceed with caution until you’ve reached the other side of it.

Older Tyres Tend To Be More Susceptible To Pothole Damage.

Older tyres tend to be more susceptible to pothole damage. They’ll have been exposed to the elements for longer, and the rubber in them has probably lost some elasticity.

Underinflated tyres are also more vulnerable—not only because they’re not as effective at absorbing shock, but also because they tend to age faster than properly inflated ones do.

The Fastest and Most Aggressive Way Is To Just Go For It.

If you can’t avoid the pothole, then the fastest and most aggressive way to drive through it is to just go for it. Braking is the most dangerous way to avoid a pothole because it puts you at risk of losing control of your vehicle and hitting another car or tree or pedestrian.

If You Choose To Drive Through The Pothole, Slow Down Before Driving Over It.

  • Slow down before driving over it.
  • Avoid sudden movements as you drive through the pothole.
  • If you are in a car with a manual transmission, shift into neutral before driving over it.
  • If you are in an automatic transmission, coast through the pothole and then accelerate slowly so that the engine doesn’t bog down and stall when climbing out of it.
  • Braking is not advisable. Your car will lose traction, which can cause even more damage to your tires and wheels.
  • Swerving is also not advisable; it will likely make the pothole even deeper and can cause you to lose control of your car.